en fisheries

fisheries
fisheries

this is a story of hope for the world’s oceans and those who depend on them.

The increasing global demand for fish has pushed the oceans to its limits. The good news for the billions who depend on fish for food and livelihoods is that properly managed marine ecosystems can rebound relatively quickly, and it is not too late to reverse trends. Communities around the world have done it for years.

ingenuity in tradition

For centuries, fishers have respected a delicate balance with the ocean — taking fish only from certain areas, of certain sizes with certain methods to maintain a healthy ecosystem and supply of fish. By tapping into the past, Rare hopes to improve the future for coastal fisheries.

the solution

This formula, which borrows from successful fisheries management techniques, creates a win-win approach that protects fishers’ wellbeing as well as the health of marine ecosystems. 

find what works. repeat

Scientists have shown this solution for fisheries management works and people have seen the results for centuries. Rare and its partners hope to bring this proven approach to thousands of the world’s coastal communities to enable marine life and fishers to thrive.

  • indonesiafisheriesslideC788x591.jpg

    indonesia fish

    Well-managed coastal fisheries around the world result in more fish — a potential increase of 56 percent in fish abundance and a potential increase in yield of up to 40 percent.

    Costello et al., 2012

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  • chilefisheriesslide788x591.jpg

    chile

    In the 16th century, Japan’s shoguns put in place one of the oldest and best developed exclusive access fishery systems in the world. More recently, in Chile, exclusive access resulted in a tripling of the average fishable stock density in just four years.

    James E. Wilen et al, 2013 Cancino, Jose, 2007

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    A global study showed a 446 percent average increase in fish biomass inside 55 fish recovery zones (no-take zones).

    Lester, S. et. al. (2009)

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    loreto clam

    In Loreto Bay, Mexico, fishers’ catch value increased in four years from $20 pesos for 20 clams to about $150 pesos after community cooperatives and processing systems were put in place along with fishery management reforms.

    Photo: Jason Houston

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The bulk of the [overfishing] problem is in little fisheries dispersed around the world where local communities do most of the fishing. That’s the real sweet spot in terms of fixing the problem. It is the place where we can get the biggest wins.”

Steve Gaines, Dean of the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at University of California, Santa Barbara

lasting change

A 2010 study published in the scientific journal, Nature, shows that strong local leadership and social cohesion are critical success factors for community managed fisheries — exactly what Rare’s signature Pride campaigns are designed, and proven, to build. Rare and its partners link the rational arguments for change with an emotional connection so the transformation lasts.

  • philippinesslideD788x591.jpg

    “Rare’s training is very different from others,” says Rare Fellow Susan Cataylo. “We already knew how to collect data, but we didn’t know how to interpret and report the information. We are thankful because when Rare’s involvement phases out, we have thos

    “Rare’s training is very different from others,” says Rare Fellow Susan Cataylo. “We already knew how to collect data, but we didn’t know how to interpret and report the information. We are thankful because when Rare’s involvement phases out, we have those skills and we can do the monitoring ourselves.”

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    Local Leadership

    Local leadership is the single most important factor in determining the success of co-managed fisheries

    Nicolas Gutierrez, et al. 2010. Leadership, social capital and incentives promote successful fisheries.” Nature, 470: 386-389. doi :10.1038/Nature 09689

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  • placesfisheriesslideA788x591.jpg

    85 marine-focused campaigns launched by Rare and partners to date.

    85 marine-focused campaigns launched by Rare and partners to date.

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  • fishabundancefisheriesslideB788x591.jpg

    47 percent average increase in fish abundance across 12 of Rare’s sites in the Philippines within two years.

    47 percent average increase in fish abundance across 12 of Rare’s sites in the Philippines within two years.

    University of the Philippines-Marine Environment and Resources Foundation (MERF)

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  • indonesiawidafisheriesslideC788x591.jpg

    Within two years, Rare’s coastal fish recovery projects facilitated the final design and successful designation of 34 fish recovery zones covering a total area of 52,139 hectares in Indonesia

    Within two years, Rare’s coastal fish recovery projects facilitated the final design and successful designation of 34 fish recovery zones covering a total area of 52,139 hectares in Indonesia.

    Photo: Djuna Ivereigh

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opportunity abounds

With most nearshore fisheries unmanaged, overexploited or even collapsed, Rare sees an unprecedented opportunity
to turn the tide for coastal fisheries around the world.

of global fisheries are overfished
of global fisheries are overfished
of the world’s 35 million fishers work in small-scale fisheries
of the world’s 35 million fishers work in small-scale fisheries
people rely on fish as an important source of protein
people rely on fish as an important source of protein

To scale this solution to thousands of the world’s most vulnerable coastal communities, Rare has partnered with Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and University of California, Santa Barbara in a global initiative called Fish Forever >